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Royal Navy recognises 168 years combined service At HMNB Clyde

9 February 2023
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ROYAL Navy personnel at HMNB Clyde were recently recognised for their outstanding service and contribution to the Royal Navy and Continuous at Sea Deterrence.

Naval Base Commander, Commodore Sharon Malkin, attended the award ceremony in the Warrant Officers and Senior Rates’ Mess where she presented the awards to the Superintendent Faslane Site community.

The awards were given for Long Service and Good Conduct (LS&GC) and between them, the four individuals receiving the awards, have clocked up over 168 years of dedicated service.

Naval Base Commander, Cdre Sharon Malkin, said: “On behalf of the Royal Navy and the nation it was a pleasure to be able to award the recipients with their respective LS&GC Bars and Valedictory certificates today.

“Often unseen, often far from home and in challenging circumstances, they have all served very long and distinguished careers in the Royal Navy and should be rightly proud of their achievements.”

Among those receiving an award was Warrant Officer (WO) 1 Glenn Male who was presented with his third Long Service and Good Conduct (LS&GC) clasp and his gold valedictory certificate for a remarkable 45 years of service in the Royal Navy.

Glen joined the Royal Navy in 1977, aged 17, and on completion of his initial training began his first deployment, joining HMS Ark Royal for her final deployment.

In 1981, he married his wife and in 1982 served in the Falklands on-board HMS Penelope, which was one of the last ships to come under attack during the conflict. He returned home from the Falklands in September of that year to meet his first daughter who was born in July and was already two months old.

Glenn said: “I signed up for the Royal Navy after chatting with my best mate from school who was home on leave and telling me all about the places he had visited. So, initially I signed up for three years, however after 18 months I withdrew my 18 months’ notice and decided to give it a bit longer.”

Glenn went on to complete the Artificer Candidate Course at HMS Sultan in 1983 before volunteering for the Submarine Service. He joined HMS Dolphin for basic training in 1985 and later that year welcomed the birth of his second daughter.

“When I had seen some of the world, I joined the Artificer Candidates Course at HMS Sultan where I learned about the ‘Silent Service’ from a Submariner on the course. Having a family and looking for more stability, the patrol life of the Polaris submarines really appealed to me, so I volunteered.” explained Glenn.

I have enjoyed my time in the Royal Navy, and I am truly grateful to the unique group of people who have supported me throughout. I would like to give special thanks to my wife and two daughters who have been there with me every step of the way. Without this support I would not be where I am today.

Warrant Officer 1 Glenn Male

He enjoyed a varied career in the Submarine Service, a total of 36 years, completing patrols on all four Resolution Class submarines, joining his first, HMS Repulse in 1986. He went on to serve on HMS Victorious and Vengeance and completed his final sea draft on Vanguard in 2009.

One of the highlights of his time as a submariner was receiving the Herbert Lott Award while serving as Nuclear Chief of the Watch on HMS Vengeance in 2003.

The Herbert Lott prize is given in recognition of exceptional efficiency and dedication to individuals or units who stand out from the ship's company for demonstrating marked efficiency in their duties and commitment to the unit and the Service.

He was recognised, not only for his professional performance and technical knowledge, but also for his contribution to the overall wellbeing and morale of the Ship’s Company. He was responsible for organising a whole range of activities including a nine-hole golf tournament which ran the length of the submarine and a garden fete complete with fortune teller.

Glenn continued: “I always felt it was important to keep morale raised especially in situations where we are separated from our families, and I was delighted to be recognised for the part I played in encouraging team spirit and a bit of friendly rivalry whilst also raising some cash for good causes.”

“I have enjoyed my time in the Royal Navy, and I am truly grateful to the unique group of people who have supported me throughout. I would like to give special thanks to my wife and two daughters who have been there with me every step of the way. Without this support I would not be where I am today.”

Glenn will leave the Royal Navy but will still be a familiar face around the Base as he takes up his new post with Babcock in the Spring.

Also achieving an outstanding 45 years’ service and receiving his third LS&GC clasp was Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Ian March. Ian joined the Navy when he was only 16 and joined his first submarine in 1979, HMS Otus. It was on this Oberon Class Submarine he earned the right to wear the coveted “dolphins” badge – the mark of a qualified submariner.

Three others also received awards: CPO David Allan, another submariner, received his second clasp to his LS&GC medal for almost forty years of service, CPO Ian March also received his second clasp, and WO1 Leslie Giffen received a silver valedictory certificate for having completing 34 years of service.  

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