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Leading Aircraft Controllers complete first class training

2 March 2018
At the Royal Navy School of Aircraft Control (RNSAC) three Leading Aircraft Controllers (LAC's) have qualified and embark on their careers in the Royal Navy

Leading Aircraft Controllers complete first class trainingCaptain Colin Miller, Deputy Chief of Staff Aviation presented the LAC's with their badges and certificates saying, "It is an absolute pleasure to be here to celebrate your success. There are exciting changes in the Royal Navy as you join the Front Line.

“With our Type 23, Type 45 and the advent of the Type 26 just around the corner, with two new Aircraft Carriers working with our ships and aircraft is a chance to be part of it all coming together, it really is a team effort and you are now part of that highly skilled team."

For LAC's Casey Marshall (24),  Robert Anderson (25) and James High (23) it's been an intense five month training period and they are now looking forward to getting to grips with the Wildcat Helicopter on 815 Naval Air Squadron (NAS) here at Yeovilton and LAC Casey Marshall with 814 NAS at RNAS Culdrose.

 
It is an absolute pleasure to be here to celebrate your success. There are exciting changes in the Royal Navy as you join the Front Line

Captain Colin Miller, Deputy Chief of Staff Aviation

The RNSAC runs four courses a year, training Leading Aircraft Controllers (LACs). The LACs are trained to control Helicopters to join the ship at sea, as well as fixed wing aircraft. In addition Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Leading hands are trained at RNSAC, although their course is a week shorter.

Ratings from any Branch of the Royal Navy can apply to transfer to the AC Branch, as long as they meet the selection criteria and subject to approval from their source branch. Initial Selection consists of a one week grading course.

A Computer Simulator is used to represent up to 5 Ships at once with their respective ACs, all networked together in real time, providing realistic training.

Starting with grading, the course runs through low level flying, and then moves onto the Sea Skimming target controller's course, which takes place actually onboard ship.

Our qualifying LAC's will be an air space expert, with a high level of responsibility as they make our global aviation missions possible.

Whether at RNAS Yeovilton or Yemen, LAC's make crucial decisions that help keep our state-of-the-art aircraft flying, and our people safe.

BZ Gentlemen!

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