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MOD recycling competition

15 September 2017
Ministry of Defence apprentices from Plymouth have been commended for innovative thinking in designing a model with recycled materials.

This competition, in its first year, is designed to encourage lifecycle building innovations by adapting and creating a design model for display, using only recyclable materials; which links into a sustainable challenge structure.   

After the competition, the structure is to be easily disassembled, allowing its components to be recycled once more, rather than landfilled to conserve resources and energy.

The Devonport Naval Base team, called String Theory, received the commendation from Alex Hurth (Defence Equipment and Support Organisation, Bristol-based).

The Sustainable Recycling Competition aims to encourage recycling on the MOD estate by showcasing inventions made from everyday waste. I congratulate team String Theory for their innovative model which captures the spirit of the competition to inspire others to recycle.

Alex Hurth (Defence Equipment and Support Organisation)

Alex said: “The Sustainable Recycling Competition aims to encourage recycling on the MOD estate by showcasing inventions made from everyday waste. I congratulate team String Theory for their innovative model which captures the spirit of the competition to inspire others to recycle.” 

The apprentices said the competition developed their organisational, planning, time management and leadership skills. Team leader Sarah Hughes and her team have completed phase one of a three-year apprenticeship programme. She said:  “It was a thoroughly enjoyable challenge.  We managed to develop and work on numerous skills whilst being part of a great team!”

The team created an animatronic arm which works with a pulley system, where the crane can grab and release an object and also adjustable for different positions and angles.

The invention was undertaken around existing college studies and in spare time outside training with the MOD. They used the following materials, from a limited permitted list five pieces of cardboard no large than 60cmx30cmx30cm - cut and shaped, three tin cans and four pounds of newspapers.

The challenge was open to all MOD sites attended by staff employed by the Defence Equipment and Support Organisation (based in Bristol).

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